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Rep. Mike Gallagher announces he’ll resign in April, further narrowing House GOP majority

Rep.
Mike
Gallagher
(R-Wis.)
announced
Friday
he
will
resign
effective
April
19,
further
narrowing
Republicans’
already
razor-thin
House
majority.

Gallagher,
who
had
already
announced
he
would
not
seek
reelection
this
year,
said
he
made
the
decision
to
resign
after
conversations
with
his
family.
He
currently
chairs
the
House
Select
Committee
on
the
Chinese
Communist
Party.
Gallagher
said
in
an
interview
with
The
Washington
Post
that
he
considers
himself
to
be
going
out
on
a
“high
note”
because
of
that
assignment.

“I’ve
worked
closely
with
House
Republican
leadership
on
this
timeline
and
look
forward
to
seeing
Speaker
[Mike]
Johnson
appoint
a
new
chair
to
carry
out
the
important
mission
of”
the
committee,
Gallagher
said
in
a
statement.

Republicans
currently
have
a
five-seat
majority
after
Rep.
Ken
Buck
(R-Colo.)
resigned
Friday,
leaving
the
House
earlier
than
he
initially
anticipated
because
he
found
his
majority
to
be
unproductive.
Buck’s
early
departure
has
also
narrowed
the
majority.

Currently,
only
Republicans
can
defect
to
pass
any
conservative
legislation
through
the
chamber
on
party-line
votes.
Once
Gallagher
leaves
mid-April,
that
margin
of
error
goes
down
to
one.

The
majority
will
narrow
even
further
once
a
Democrat
is
elected
to
replace
former
Rep.
Brian
Higgins
(D-N.Y.),
who
also
resigned
earlier
this
year.
Republicans
will
not
get
a
reprieve
until
a
Republican
is
sworn
in
following
a
May
runoff
election
to
assume
the
seat
former
Speaker
Kevin
McCarthy
(R-Calif.)
held
for
decades.

Gallagher
has
represented
Wisconsin’s
8th
Congressional
District
since
2017.
The
district
in
northeastern
Wisconsin
is
solidly
Republican.

Gallagher

announced
in
February

he
would
not
run
for
another
term,
saying
in
a
statement
that
“electoral
politics
was
never
supposed
to
be
a
career
and,
trust
me,
Congress
is
no
place
to
grow
old.”
Earlier
in
February,
Gallagher

upset
fellow
Republicans

by
opposing
the
impeachment
of
Homeland
Security
Secretary
Alejandro
Mayorkas,
which
narrowly
failed
on
the
first
attempt.

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