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What could happen as Trump faces deadline on half-billion-dollar bond

Donald
Trump,
who
lost
a
civil
fraud
case
in
New
York
last
month,
must
put
up
a
bond
of
nearly
half-a-billion
dollars
if
he
wants
to
stop
New
York
Attorney
General
Letitia
James
(D)
from
collecting
while
he
appeals.
James
is
poised
to
begin
claiming
his
assets
if
he
fails
to
put
up
the
bond
by
Monday.

In
February,
Judge
Arthur
F.
Engoron

ruled

that
Trump,
his
two
eldest
sons
and
two
of
his
executives
submitted
false
data
to
lenders
and
insurance
companies
to
secure
better
deals.
Engoron
ordered
Trump
and
his
co-defendants
to
pay
$464
million,
an
amount
that
continues
to
grow
at
a
rate
of
more
than
$100,000
per
day.
In
the
weeks
since
that
judgment,
the
former
president’s
options
have
dwindled.

Trump’s
attorneys
have
asked
appellate
judges
to
reduce,
delay
or
waive
the
bond
requirement.
The
appeals
court
has
yet
to
reach
a
final
decision.

His
lawyers

told

an
appellate
court
that
they
tried
to
get
a
bond
through
30
different
insurance
companies
but
none
offered
one
because
they
would
not
accept
real
estate

which
accounts
for
most
of
Trump’s
wealth

as
collateral.
Selling
golf
courses
or
hotels
generally
takes
much
longer
than
a
few
days
or
weeks,
time
he
no
longer
has.

Trump,
who
has
raged
against
Engoron’s
decision
and
James
on
social
media,
is
now
down
to
a
handful
of
mostly
unpalatable
outcomes.
Here
are
the
scenarios
experts
say
could
be
the
most
likely
to
play
out
over
coming
days.

Nothing
happens
immediately

The
appeals
court
generally
issues
rulings
on
Tuesdays
and
Thursdays,
so
there
is
very
little
chance
it
will
act
by
Monday
on
Trump’s
request
to
waive
the
bond
requirement.
If
it
doesn’t,
and
if
Trump
doesn’t
post
a
bond
by
then,
legal
experts
say
there
is
nothing
preventing
James
from
calling
on
the
New
York
City
sheriffs
or
on
city
marshals
to
begin
seizing
his
assets.

But
there
are
reasons
for
her
to
wait.
Legal
experts
say
Trump
has
a
chance
of
getting
some
type
of
relief
from
the
appeals
court.
If
James
begins
moving
on
his
assets
before
the
court
rules,
she
may
have
to
backtrack
afterward.
She
also
may
consider
the
optics
of
moving
quickly.
As
Nikos
Passas,
a
Northeastern
University
criminology
professor,
put
it:
“She
doesn’t
want
to
be
accused
of
being
overly
aggressive
and
unfair.”

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